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Supporting rubber farmers to increase their income
Supporting rubber farmers to increase their income
News Jun 10, 2017

Our Rurality programme has supported rubber farmers in Thailand to become more self sufficient.

Being self sufficient is vital for farmers. A big part of achieving this is through various means of income. Doing so makes them more resilient.

With our support rubber farmers have begun earning additional income by selling fish. We have helped with the technical support allowing farmers to focus on their business.

After five months trailing Climbing Perch, Mr Mathoros, (pictured below) from Kanjanadit District, has been able to earn an additional monthly income of 5,325 Thai Baht (THB) a month.

“Raising Climbing Perch provides food security and self-sufficiency,” he said. “Additionally, it is a good alternative source of income. My wife is a local food seller, she can now lower her cost of cooking by using home-raised fish as raw ingredients as well as offering further choices of food to raise the market’s interest.”

Initial investment of the equipment necessary to keep the fish need not be high. Mr. Woothichai Thanawoot is a 56 year old farmer from Ban Nasan District, (pictured above, on the left), who made his pond with very little cost from a plastic sheet and water from his overflow system.

In the six months spent on this project he has used the fish to feed his family, while also earning an additional 7,820 THB from selling them too.

Mr Manoch Rojanachiva, also from Ban Nasan district, recognises the additional income and improved household food security keeping the fish provides. Having invested 3,650 THB in the project he earned 11,350 THB selling fish.

Related News:

Areas of work:
Resilient farmers

Solutions:
Rurality

Products:
Natural Rubber

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